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Looking for a 3D Printer backplot program

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  • Looking for a 3D Printer backplot program

    Looking for a 3D printer backplot program, similar to the ones used in the CNC industry.

    These are NOT just simulators, but displays the actual G Code tex and allows you to step through it line-by-line - displaying the simulation as you step through it.

    This way, youcan see each line of gcode and what it is doing.

    See video example here:

    This is how NC Plot works - http://ncplot.com/ncplotv2/ncplotv2.htm
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQqy4dAyPwk note - the music is a bit loud. I hate vids like this, but it gives an idea of what a CNC backplot program does.

    another vid here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRZH4rLkmKg

    Note how as the user steps through the code in the left panel, the workspace on the right shows where the tool just moved to.


    I currently use NC Plot, Metacut View, Camotics, etc... for my CNC machines

    I know Camotics is saying that they'll support 3D printers, but not as of yet


  • #2
    That's a clever way to market a program.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by roon4660 View Post
      That's a clever way to market a program.
      I'm not trying to market a program... I want backplot program like I have for my CNC toolpaths. Geez...
      Geez Dr. Vax - what the heck is up with your forum members? That's not cool - I'm asking for help. I get silly...

      I have no affiliation with any of the programs I mentioned. In fact, I'm upset that they don't support Marlin G Code - then I wouldn't even be here.

      I'm not realyl into the whole maker thing - I have to use a 3D printer for my day job..

      Again, not cool...

      My lab:
      http://www.ajawamnet.com/

      My shop:
      http://www.ajawamnet.com/ajawam3/swarf/swarf.htm

      Yea - in 1995 I invented one for the first wireless IoT devices - see the patent here: https://patents.google.com/patent/US6208266

      My whole take on the maker thing:
      http://www.ajawamnet.com/ajawamnet/m...e_a_maker.html



      Comment


      • roon4660
        roon4660 commented
        Editing a comment
        I meant it as a compliment actually.

    • #4
      It's OK ajawamnet, I got your meaning. I don't have any suggestions for you, although I like the idea of a simulator program.

      Comment


      • #5
        On the last Meltzone-Podcast, they had the same discussion, if I understand you right.

        An application that simulates printing process and the thermal behaviour of the already printed layers while progressing the print.

        Comment


        • #6
          You might try https://ncviewer.com/ as they claim to support both mills, lathes, and 3D printers.

          Cheers

          P.S. -- Calm down. Remember why DRVAX setup this forum in the first place.

          Comment


          • #7
            Why do you say "Calm down." I'm not following.

            Comment


            • #8
              Found a backplot program that sort of works. The reason was to see what the Cura Arc Welder plugin was doing. It's pretty cool - turns all those G1 splined segs into arcs - see the vid of the difference here:



              Note the one on the top is the typical "G1 only" cura slice. The bottom with the red arcs is the Arc Welder output. Arc Welder is in the Ultimaker Marketplace.

              Make sure your machine can handle arcs...

              Note how much faster the slice using arc welder simulates. Look at the lines of G code in the arc welder version where there's now G3 arc's Do note that you need to have I, J, K Modal set.

              BTW the backplot is CAD-KAS. I've got other stuff from (mainly DXF programs) He writes some nice stuff.

              Comment


              • #9
                The simulation is certainly a lot faster. I do wonder how much faster the actual printing would be though. Given how slow hotends typically have to move, I'm thinking the difference might not be all that dramatic. Still, faster is faster. To me though, improved quality would be the prime motivator.

                Just looked up CAD-KAS: $79US. Nice program, but not worth it to me.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Ender5r View Post

                  Just looked up CAD-KAS: $79US. Nice program, but not worth it to me.
                  Just wait for slicer updates including Arc and this is will be all in the usual preview.

                  Comment

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